Tag Archives: pond

Featured Product – Nitrate Klear

What Is Nitrate Klear?

This weeks featured product is Nitrate Klear.
Nitrate Klear is a natural & safe nitrate removal treatment designed for ponds and aquariums. High nitrate levels can be very dangerous to fish and can lead to death. By reducing the nitrate levels in your pond or aquarium you will reduce the risk of fish death, reduce the risk of blanket weed.

How Does Nitrate Klear Work?

Nitrate Klear uses nitrifying bacteria that have been chosen specifically to reduce the harmful levels of nitrates founds in ponds and aquariums. The bacteria are most effective in water temperatures above 8°C and we recommend using a nitrate test kit to monitor the nitrates to a safe level.
Continued treatment with Nitrate Klear will keep levels safe and reduce the risk of any infections occurring in fish.

Don’t Just Take Our Word for It…

Amazon Customer – Great weapon in the war on green algae.

Northern Girl – My pond looks amazing after 1 use!

Kevin McKinley – I have used this product before and it works very well. The Nitrate levels are back to good, the fish are feeding well again and I am happy.


What Should Nitrate Levels Be in A Pond?

Nitrate levels should be kept between 20ppm and 60ppm. Anything above this can cause irreversible damage to your fish, including their liver, spleen, nervous system and kidneys.

Nitrate levels are easy to neutralise and can be done so within hours, using Nitrate Klear.

What Is Nitrate in A Pond?

Nitrate is a by-product of the bacterial reduction of ammonia. Ammonia is released into your pond via fish waste, this is then converted into Nitrites by good bacteria and the final product is Nitrates.

Nitrates can be fatal to your fish if they are not kept in check. Providing your water parameters are stable and have been treated with Pond Equaliser, you should never have to worry about Nitrates but it is good practice to regularly test for them and if they are high, treat with Nitrate Klear to reduce them back to a normal level.

How to Reduce Nitrate in A Pond?

In addition to using Nitrate Klear there are a couple of things that you could do to try and reduce Nitrate levels in your pond. It may be necessary to do a 1/3 water change using tap water, if you do this, be sure to check your other levels as tap water contains heavy metals that such as copper that you don’t want in your pond. Increase the aeration of your pond when doing a water change.

However, the most likely cause for a spike in Nitrate levels is due to a lack of, or underdeveloped aerobic bacteria in your pond. Nitrate Klear will boost these bacteria levels to help digest the Nitrates

Effects of Nitrates in Water?

High Nitrate, Nitrite or Ammonia levels in your pond can lead to fatal consequences to your fish. Brown Blood Disease is the most common problem linked to high Nitrate levels. The Nitrates combine with the Haemoglobin, (the protein molecule in red blood cells that transports oxygen) and make the red blood cells incapable of transporting oxygen. This then starves the fish of oxygen, you may see them gasping for air at the surface of the water.

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Featured Product – Sludge Klear

What Is Sludge Klear?

This weeks featured product is Sludge Klear.
Sludge Klear is biological pond water treatment that targets the build-up of sludge found at the bottom of ponds.
As well as being used directly in the water to target sludge, Sludge Klear can be used as a biological filter starter for ponds by helping create the perfect biological balance in your filter.

How Does Sludge Klear Work?

Each Sludge Klear tablet is packed with over 100 billion task-specific, beneficial bacteria that have been specifically chosen to target sludge. The bacteria break down the sludge that sticks to your pond, digesting and loosening it to enable the filter to catch it. Once this has been caught in the filter, it can physically be washed away using a hosepipe.
Sludge Klear contains patented, low temperature bacteria that is capable of working down to 4°C  and can be used all year round. This allows for treatment in winter to reduce the amount of sludge and the effect of green water in spring.

Sludge Klear can be used to solve sludge problems or as a regular treatment for protection and because it is safe for fish, it’s perfect for use in garden ponds, Koi ponds and natural ponds.

Don’t Just Take Our Word for It…

Alex Whittle – Simple to use and very effective treatment.

Lorraine Pratt – We discovered a neglected pond in our garden, overgrown and filled with sludge and…… It is now clear thanks to our hard work and your product.

Dlh – Absolutely great cleared our pond. Best thing we have tried AND we have tried lots

What Is Pond Sludge?

Pond sludge is the thick brown layer of muck and grime found at the bottom of your pond. This grime gives off the smell of rotten eggs or hydrogen sulphide when disturbed. It is formed from a build-up of sediment that sink to the bottom of the pond and begin to rot. This build-up can be made up of things like excess fish food, fish waste & debris such as leaves and twigs. For the most part, pond sludge is impenetrable to oxygen and as a result this sludge will begin smothering the good, aerobic bacteria and algae whilst producing bad, anaerobic bacteria.

Do Pond Sludge Removers Work?

There is regular debate around whether sludge removers work. This depends on the type of sludge remover in question. If you are looking at chemical sludge removers then yes, they may work, but your pond has millions of living organisms in there; whilst the chemicals might not be strong enough to harm your fish, they will certainly be harming the good bacteria and algae that your pond needs.

On the other hand, natural, bacterial pond sludge removers are completely safe for all living organisms found in your pond and produce safer, better results than chemicals. Bacterial sludge removers penetrate the sludge and break down the anaerobic bacteria which allows the sludge to pass through to your filters. Please be prepared to have to clean your filters every couple of days!

What Eats Pond Sludge?

Add some bottom feeding fish to your pond! You could try adding a couple of Tench or a few Gudgeon as these are both bottom feeders, but they don’t feed on the sludge itself. They might disturb the sludge when looking for food but they won’t intentionally eat the sludge.

The best thing for eating pond sludge is bacteria and enzymes. The bacteria found in Sludge Klear is designed to break down the sludge at the bottom of your pond and enable it to pass through your filter.

You could always attack it from both angles by introducing bottom feeding fish and bacteria. The fish will disturb the sludge, making it easier for the enzymes and bacteria to digest.

Is Pond Sludge Good for The Garden?

We have been asked on a couple of occasions if the sludge found at the bottom of your pond can be used as a compost in your garden. Short answer, yes it can. The sludge in your pond has absorbed many of the excess, useful nutrients in your pond and can be used to pass these on to your garden plants.

Ideally there shouldn’t be a thick enough layer of sludge in your pond to need to use it in the garden, so keep your sludge down with Sludge Klear.

If you only have a thin layer of sludge we would advise you to just use Sludge Klear and keep the layer thin. If your layer of sludge is thick, remove some by hand and place it in your compost bin. After removing some of the sludge by hand, we recommend using Sludge Klear to digest any of the remaining sludge and improve the condition of your pond. Be careful when removing the sludge if you have a pond liner as they can be very costly to replace or repair if you rip them.

Featured Product – Pond Klear

What Is Pond Klear?

This weeks featured product is Pond Klear.
Pond Klear is a biological, bacterial pond algae treatment product that is 100% safe for all fish, wildlife, pets and humans. Pond klear clears pond water, removes green algae and restores the biological balance back into a pond.

How Does Pond Klear Work?

By using beneficial bacteria, Pond Klear naturally breaks down the microscopic algae particles that cause green water. These particles are then clumped together, get pushed into the water column and get sucked through the pump and into the filter box, allowing you to physically wash away the algae from the filters.
Continued, frequent treatment will keep pond water clear all year and provide a healthy environment for fish and wildlife to live in.
Pond’s that have a pump and filtration system should expect to see results within two weeks whereas pond without will see results between 4-6 weeks.

Don’t Just Take Our Word for It…

Alan Epsom – I am very pleased with this I did notice a difference the following day thank you

Mrs H. – Only recently added to the pond but seems to be working ok

Johnny – Excellent product which cleared my pond within one day. I would certainly recommend Envil Pond Klear!!!

How to Keep Pond Water Clear?

To keep your pond water clear, you need to help it from day one. Dirty pond water can be caused by several things, from pond sludge, to pond algae, if these are not kept on top of, it is easy for your ponds water clarity to quickly deteriorate.

If you have a new pond, we recommend testing your water with a test kit and then if needed, an application of Pond Equaliser to balance your water parameters. When your water parameters are where they should be, treat your pond with Pond Klear and Sludge Klear to introduce the beneficial aerobic bacteria you need.

Providing you keep on top with your bacterial treatments, remove any debris from your pond, don’t overfeed your fish or overstock your pond with too many fish and ensure you filters are kept as clean as possible then your pond should be crystal clear throughout the year.

What Causes Pond Algae?

Unfortunately, pond algae or green water needs very little to thrive in your pond. Sun, nutrients and the lack of movement in the water provide the perfect growing conditions for algae. These algae are small single cell algae that multiple quickly and soon give your pond that “pea soup” look.

The algae that causes green water is almost microscopic and as a result can’t be filtered out of your pond.

When to Treat Pond Algae?

Most people believe pond algae begins growing in the summer as this is the time it becomes obviously present in your pond. However, the growth of the algae actually starts in spring. Fish start to become more active and start producing more waste as the temperature picks up. Although the sun is not very hot, the daylight hours have increased and are providing the algae with the perfect growing conditions.

Ideally you should be treating your pond throughout the year the keep algae at bay, but if you have missed the winter, make sure you start treating or preventing algae in Spring.

Can Pond Algae Kill Fish?

Although green water can look dangerous it is unlikely to harm your fish. Green water is caused by very small, single cell algae that multiply and eventually cause a green tint to your water. Unlike blanket weed that is very dense, the algae cells that cause green water are so small that they can pass through your finest filter. As they are so small they pose very little threat to your fish with regards to trapping them and don’t pose any health problems to your fish.

Whilst the algae cells may not be dangerous to your fish, the fact that you have green water suggests you have an imbalance in your pond which can be very dangerous to your fish. Use Pond Equaliser to stabilise your water parameters and then treat your green water with Pond Klear or Pond Klear Xtra depending on the size and condition of your pond.

 

 

 

 

The Do’s & Don’ts For Ponds

Pond keeping can be a mind field when it comes to knowing what you can and can’t do to achieve algae free, crystal clear water. One ‘expert’ will tell you to do this, another ‘expert’ will tell you to do that and suddenly it all becomes a very confusing, tangled web of conflicting information.

We are not claiming to be experts but we do know a lot about bacteria and how it thrives in ponds. Therefore, we have compiled a list of do’s and don’ts to help you create the perfect water conditions in your pond, keep algae at bay and maintain a balanced eco system.

DO treat your pond with a bacterial product on a regular basis.
Beneficial, aerobic bacteria is the foundation to any ponds eco system, it keeps algae at bay by eliminating any excess nutrients in the pond, prevents sludge from becoming anaerobic and releasing toxic hydrogen sulphide into the pond and helps prevent fish illnesses.
Bacteria needs to be topped up regularly. As with any living organism, it only has a certain lifespan and once it has died, it needs replacing.

DO use a hosepipe to wash your filters.
This is a very conflicting point within the pond industry but at Envii we recommend using a hosepipe to wash filters. The chlorine that is found in tap water is only present as a trace element and the amount that is left behind on the filters is so small that it will have a very insignificant effect on the bacteria that is present in the pond.
By using pond water to wash your filters, you will remove a lot more of the bacteria that is present in the pond and then have to replace the pond water with tap water.

DO check your water parameters on a regular basis.
Although your water may look clear, it may not be the quality, healthy water that your fish need. Check your water parameters every couple of weeks to ensure your pH, KH, ammonia and other levels are where they should be. If you don’t know what your water parameters should be, have a read of our Water Parameters post. Water parameters can change rapidly and can have severe consequences on your fish.
If you find that your water parameters are not where they should be, use Pond Equaliser to instantly stabilise them and create the perfect water conditions for your fish.

DO ask for technical advice.
Nobody wants to buy a product that they think is going to solve their problem, only to find out that they have purchased the wrong product or not used it correctly. We provide expert advice not only for our products, but for any other pond query either by email or phone. So, take advantage of us and give us a call!

DO treat your pond with a bacterial product all year.
We hear from more and more people every week who had a crystal-clear pond in winter that suddenly went green in spring. Algae won’t grow below 8°C which is why ponds look good during winter. However, bacteria also die when it gets below a certain temperature and with a lack of algae to feed on, come spring their numbers have decreased drastically. The depleted number of bacteria, coupled with the rise in temperature in spring quickly results in an algae bloom that will turn your water green.
Treat your pond with Winter Pond Treatment during the colder months to keep bacteria present in the pond and prevent an algae bloom in spring.

DO keep your pumps and filters running all year.
A lot of pond owners decide that once the temperature drops, the pumps should be turned off as the pond can no longer be enjoyed. However, by turning the pumps off, you will be creating problems that will not show themselves until spring. During winter, a lot of debris falls in to ponds and starts to break down. If this debris is not cleared out, it releases excess nutrients into the water that algae will feed on when spring arrives.
Keep your pump and filter running to remove any of this debris and keep the water moving.

DON’T empty your pond and start again.
One common misconception when a pond is struggling with algae or green water is to empty all the water out, clean the pond and refill it. However, this is possibly the worst thing to do in this situation. By removing all the water, you also remove any of the beneficial bacteria that was in the pond. When the pond is refilled it is filled with what is technically sterile water that contains chlorine, toxic heavy metals and little to no bacteria. Initially, the pond appears to be in a very good condition as the sterile water stays clear for a few weeks but then quickly turns green due to the lack of bacteria available to fight off any algae spores.
If for some reason you do have to empty your pond, introduce a bacterial product as soon as you have refilled to introduce bacteria into the pond straight away.

DON’T remove blanket weed whilst it is still alive
The most obvious thing to do when you see blanket weed appearing in your pond is to pull it out and throw it away. If you have ever done this, you will know that within days, the blanket weed reappears and you begin the cycle again.
If you remove blanket weed when it is still alive (green) the strands tear and release new spores back into the water.
Ensure that any blanket weed you remove has been killed first by using Blanketweed Klear. For more information on blanket weed, read our post on How to Get Rid of Blanket Weed.

DON’T change your filters
If your filters are getting dirty when using a bacterial product, it is because your pond is dirty. You should only clean the filters, not change them.
Bacteria anchor themselves on to the filters and digest any algae or sludge that gets caught. If you change the filters, you remove all the beneficial bacteria that has been added to the filters.
If you have to change your filters, be sure to apply a bacterial product directly to the new filters.

DON’T introduce plants without leaching out fertiliser
When buying plants to add into your ponds, the easiest place to buy them from is the local garden centre. However, these plants are grown in fertilisers that aim to speed up the growing process to allow the garden centres to sell them quicker. If these plants are added straight into the pond, the fertiliser leaches out and in to the pond, harming the beneficial bacteria.
Before adding plants to the pond, put them in a bucket of water for 7-10 days and change the water every day. This will leach out the fertiliser and they will then be safe to add to the pond. For more information on pond plants, read our post Should I Keep Aquatic Plants.

DON’T feed fish during winter
As the temperature starts to drop in autumn, you should consider changing over to a high protein food for your fish. When winter begins, stop feeding your fish all together. Fish don’t feed throughout winter, so the food that is thrown into the pond will break down and release nutrients into the pond to feed any algae spores when the temperatures rise.

DON’T allow your pond to freeze over completely during winter
You should avoid letting your pond freeze over during winter at all costs. If the pond does freeze over completely, it will create an air tight seal that will not allow any oxygen to enter the pond or any toxic gases to leave the pond. If this continues for an extended period, it may result in fish death. For more tips on caring for your pond in winter read our Preparing Pond for Winter post.

DON’T overstock the pond
It is very easy to overstock a pond, after all, who wants a clear pond and only two fish to look at. However, if a pond contains too many fish it can have a big effect on the water quality in the pond. Fish produce a lot of waste; this waste gives off ammonia which can in turn raise the pH in the pond and lead to illness or death among the fish.
As a rule of thumb it is recommended that a pond has 55cm of fish per 1,000 litres. The average fish size in UK ponds is around 6 inches so this would equate to 3-4 fish per 1,000  litres.

Do's & Don'ts Infographic

Preparing Your Pond For Winter

For any enthusiastic gardener, autumn is a perplexing time. Your arduous work throughout spring and summer begins to fade away, with the promise of next season and another fruitful crop just on the horizon. Pond keepers are no different in this respect; they toil all year to fight off algae blooms and keep their pond in the best condition for its inhabitants, only to be bombarded with algae come spring. The thought of having to cover up the pond, no longer being able to sit around and enjoy it with a cold drink in hand, can be a little sad. However, with a little maintenance during autumn and winter, your pond will be match fit for the first sign of a warm spring day.

The main priority for any pond owner throughout the year is to keep the pond water ‘healthy’. If the water parameters are correct in terms of pH and KH (carbonate hardness), you will provide a healthy environment for aquatic wildlife, fish and beneficial bacteria. It cannot be stressed enough, that without the water parameters being correct, beneficial probiotic bacteria will struggle to deal with the unwanted organics added during autumn & winter that elevate the risk of fish & wildlife death and algae blooms in spring.

Without any care or maintenance over autumn and winter, ponds begin to form a layer of sludge on the bottom from unwanted organics such as leaves, twigs and faecal waste from fish and wildlife. Whilst frogs and newts love to lay in this sludge, if left untreated, it can cause an imbalance in the water, making it poisonous to wildlife and fish by discharging Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) gas from anaerobic bacteria inside the sludge.

Essential Autumn Care Tasks
To prevent an algae bloom in spring, complete these simple tasks during autumn:

Check your water quality

After a spring and summer of algae, acidic rain and fish waste your pH and KH levels will need adjusting. The pH should be between 7 & 8.3 and the KH level should be above 5. You can either buy a quality testing kit, take a sample of water to your local water garden centre or simply use Pond Equaliser to instantly stabilise the pH at 8, and KH above 5. Pond Equaliser will also remove any ammonia and heavy metals to create a safe and healthy environment for fish, wildlife and beneficial probiotic bacteria.

Add bacteria

Add quality, probiotic bacteria that are capable of working at temperatures lower than 08°C. Use Pond Klear for smaller ponds, Natural Pond Klear for larger natural ponds and Winter Pond Treatment for the colder winter months. Task-specific probiotic bacteria slowly digest any debris and unwanted organics and reduce the toxic H2S levels.

Tend to plants

Prune back any aquatic plants and remove any floating debris from the pond; this debris can be deposited in a compost heap as it is high in nitrogen and other essential nutrients for plant growth. Don’t forget to check for any wildlife that may be hibernating when removing aquatic plants or sludge; newts and frogs will hibernate in sludge and dragonfly larvae can lie dormant in plants for several months. When you remove any debris or plants from a pond, leave them at the side for a couple of hours to allow any wildlife to make its way back to the pond.

Cover up

Cover your pond with a net to catch leaves and twigs; leave gaps around the edge to allow wildlife to get in and out of the pond. The frogs and newts that may be hibernating at the bottom of the pond will be ready and waiting to eradicate slugs and snails in spring.

Put your fish on a diet

Feed fish less as the temperature drops, or consider moving to a low protein food. As temperatures drop, fish eat less, once it gets below a certain temperature they will stop feeding. If you continue feeding them, the wasted food will break down, release nutrients into the water to feed any algae and will add to the layer of sludge at the bottom.

Deep clean

If you have a filter, clean it thoroughly in autumn to remove any algae or debris trapped during summer and clean monthly throughout autumn and winter.

Keep it moving, slowly

Keep pumps and filters running all year; they will continue removing debris and prevent the pond from freezing over. If possible, turn the flow rate down to avoid cooling the water further. If water freezes over, it restricts the available oxygen for fish, and seals in the toxic gases that can be released from decaying organics.

Check your water quality, again…

Most important of all, get the water parameters right to increase the ponds biological self-cleaning ability, as this will reduce the amount of work required, and increase the enjoyment of your pond in spring & summer 2018.

For more information on why ponds go green in spring, read our blog post here.

Featured Product – Pond Equaliser

What Is Pond Equaliser?

This weeks featured product is Pond Equaliser.
Pond Equaliser instantly stabilises key water parameters in ponds and aquariums such as pH, KH, GH and ammonia. It is crucial that these parameters are balanced as they determine the biological balance in a pond. Balanced and stable water parameters provide both fish and beneficial bacteria with perfect living conditions and reduces the risk of algae, sludge and blanket weed.
Pond Equaliser only contains ingredients that are naturally found in water and are completely harmless to fish, wildlife and humans.

How Does Pond Equaliser Work?

Pond Equaliser adds essential minerals to pond water to stabilise the key water properties such as the carbonate hardness (KH), the pH and the general hardness (GH)
It also adds calcium to the water to neutralise any toxic heavy metals (found in tap water) and eliminate ammonia which is a by-product of fish waste breaking down.
By improving the water quality, the biological capabilities of the pond are dramatically increased, ensuring bacterial based maintenance products work at maximum efficiency.

Don’t Just Take Our Word for It…

MJA – Pond colour has definitely changed from Pea Green and getting clearer – not fully there yet but is looking good.

Jules – Used in conjunction with Envii Pond Klear worked miracles. Within 4 days could see the fish again and green weed cleared.

Amazon Customer – Did what it said on the pack tested water and fish are happy now!

What Are the Ideal Water Parameters for Fish?

Oxygen levels in your pond should be a minimum of 5.0 mg/L and a maximum of 18mg/L.

Ph levels should be kept as neutral as possible at around 7, but they can fluctuate down to 6.8 and up to 8.2 whilst still be classed as healthy.

KH levels, or carbonate hardness levels, should be kept at around 105ppm but can fluctuate by 15ppm either way and still be classed as healthy.

Ammonia levels should be at zero as they can be very harmful to fish, Nitrite levels should be as close to zero as possible and Nitrate levels can be up to 50ppm.

For more information, read our blog on the Ideal Water Parameters.

Why Is It Important to Monitor The pH Of Pond Water?

It is essential to monitor your pH levels very closely as they can have fatal effects on your fish if you don’t. Your pH level should sit around 7, which is neutral on the pH scale. With every digit above this, your fish come closer to being exposed to dangerous levels of high acidity and alkalinity. High acidity and alkalinity can increase the toxicity of any ammonia in your pond. Ammonia can cause physical burns to your fish’s gills and if it becomes too high will cause ammonia poisoning.

How to Lower Pond pH?

Lowering your ponds pH levels is very easy. As you are reading this we will assume you have checked your water with a test kit and found that your pH levels are too high.

The next step is simple. Follow the instructions for Pond Equaliser and your water parameters (pH, KH, GH, Ammonia & Heavy Metals) will be stable within a few hours.

Why Is My Pond pH So High?

The first thing to do if you get a high pH reading is to take another. Make sure you take one reading in the morning and one later in the day, ideally with similar weather conditions. The reason for this is that algae is more active in the late morning and will be sucking up carbon dioxide which will in turn cause your pH to read high. The algae are less active first thing in the morning and later at night which is why it is best to take two readings.

If your pH level is still high, treat your pond with Pond Equaliser and then take two readings 24 hours later.

 

How To Get Rid Of Blanket Weed

What Is Blanket Weed?

If you have not yet come across this nuisance, congratulations! Blanket weed or long string algae is one of the most well-known (and hated) pond weeds in the UK. It is a long thin alga that has no leaves, stems or roots and forms large, dense pillows of green weed that float around the top of your pond and attach themselves to the side walls. Blanketweed thrives in ornamental ponds with pumps due to the exposure to sunlight, flowing water and abundant nutrients available.

Is Blanketweed Dangerous?

Short answer, yes it can be dangerous to your pond and its habitants.
Blanket weed needs the same nutrients to grow as all your other aquatic plants. It can grow very quickly and will easily outperform and outgrow your other marginal or floating plants as well as killing off any submerged plants due to blocking out any natural light.

As well as competing with your plants, blanket weed will compete with fish for vital oxygen which could lead to your fish dying through lack of oxygen. Not only can the blanket weed deprive fish of much needed oxygen, fish can sometimes swim into the blanketweed, get stuck and then not be able to free themselves and eventually dye.

How to Remove Blanketweed

It is not advisable to remove living blanket weed as this will cause the weed to release spores into the pond which will in turn, create more blanketweed. We suggest treating your pond firstly with Pond Equaliser to get your ponds water quality perfect and then using Blanketweed Klear. Blanketweed klear is easy to use, simply scatter it on the blanket weed, wait for it to die and then scoop out the dead weed and either throw it into your garden waste bin or composting bin. Blanket weed is full of nitrogen which is good for composting.

Preventing Blanketweed

After you have removed the blanket weed from your pond you will want to do everything possible to prevent it from returning in the future. Be sure to have lots of aquatic plants that will absorb excess nutrients in the pond. Keep your fish stock in line with the size of your pond, too many fish can lead to excess waste being produced which can create even more excess nutrients. Check your water quality regularly with a test kit and keep your pH, KH & GH levels balanced.